Where Is the Parthenon?

Where Is the Parthenon?

Language: English

Pages: 112

ISBN: 0448488892

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Discover the ruins of the Parthenon, one of the most famous and beautiful places in the world!
    
Athens, Greece, is best known for the Parthenon, the ruins of an ancient temple completed in 438 BC to honor the goddess Athena. But what many people don't know is that it only served as a temple for a couple hundred years. It then became a church, then a mosque, and by the end of the 1600s served as a storehouse for munitions. When an enemy army fired hundreds of cannon balls at the Acropolis, one directly hit the Parthenon. Much of the sculpture was destroyed, three hundred people died, and the site fell into ruin. Today, visitors continue to flock to this world famous landmark, which has become a symbol for Ancient Greece, democracy, and modern civilization. Includes black-and-white illustrations and a foldout color map!

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the top of the inner walls. And in triangle-shaped spaces in front and back, made by the roof and support beams. The triangular spaces are called pediments. They each housed about twenty-five larger-than-life statues. These statues were carved in studios near the temple and later lifted into place. Phidias probably designed them, but others did the carving. The pediments told the story of two myths that were important to the people of Athens. Less than half the pediment statues still exist.

west pediment portrayed, many of the major statues in this group—both of Athena and Poseidon, for example—were destroyed, and no drawings were ever done to show what they had looked like. So archeologists can take only a best guess at how the figures were posed and arranged. Below the pediments are scenes carved into four-foot square panels of marble. These panels are called metopes. There are ninety-two of them. The figures—two or three on each—are carved quite deeply into the marble. But none

of Athena. There, the goddess would be presented with a new robe. Many historians believe that is what the child with the cloth is holding: Athena’s new robe. Also, there are cows and lambs in the parade, which would be sacrificed for Athena. They were part of every All-Athens Festival. Yet the idea that scenes showing a festival would appear on an important temple is odd. Temple sculpture portrayed important religious myths, like the birth of Athena, not holiday scenes. The parade on the

of Athena. There, the goddess would be presented with a new robe. Many historians believe that is what the child with the cloth is holding: Athena’s new robe. Also, there are cows and lambs in the parade, which would be sacrificed for Athena. They were part of every All-Athens Festival. Yet the idea that scenes showing a festival would appear on an important temple is odd. Temple sculpture portrayed important religious myths, like the birth of Athena, not holiday scenes. The parade on the

sacrifice. She thought it was better to let one person die, even if it was her own child, than to let all of Athens be destroyed. According to Connelly, the five figures are the king, queen, and their three daughters. The person with the cloth is the daughter who will be sacrificed. Connelly believes she is not holding a new robe for Athena. The cloth is to wrap her own body in after she is killed! This myth about Athens was a very important one. It was a sacred, or holy, story. Connelly thinks

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