Songs of Kabir (New York Review Books Classics)

Songs of Kabir (New York Review Books Classics)

Kabir

Language: English

Pages: 146

ISBN: B004FEG3BC

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


A New York Review Books Original
Transcending divisions of creed, challenging social distinctions of all sorts, and celebrating individual unity with the divine, the poetry of Kabir is one of passion and paradox, of mind-bending riddles and exultant riffs. These new translations by Arvind Krishna Mehrotra, one of India’s finest contemporary poets, bring out the richness, wit, and power of a literary and spiritual master.

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Kripalu Yoga: A Guide to Practice On and Off the Mat

Spirituality in Dark Places: The Ethics of Solitary Confinement

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

salvation, Then saying sugarcane Should sweeten the mouth, Saying fire burn the feet, Saying water slake thirst, And saying food Would be as good as a belch. If saying money made everyone rich, There’d be no beggars in the streets. My back is turned on the world, You hear me singing of Rama and you smile. One day, Kabir says, All bundled up, You’ll be delivered to Deathville. KG 179 Try though you may, Neither punditry Nor penance Nor telling beads will bring you To the

lagi kaise chutte is from the “western” tradition. It is also one of only three Kabir poems in Sen that are found in the pre-1700 Kabir manuscripts. Given below are its opening lines in three translations: How could the love between Thee and me sever? As the leaf of the lotus abides on the water: so thou art my Lord, and I am Thy servant. As the night-bird Chakor gazes all night at the moon: so Thou art my Lord and I am Thy servant. (Tagore)[18] Why should we two ever want to part?

Pad-s (New Delhi, 2000). The number following the abbreviation indicates the number of the poem in that edition. Songs of Kabir Upside-Down Poems Brother, I’ve seen some Astonishing sights: A lion keeping watch Over pasturing cows; A mother delivered After her son was; A guru prostrated Before his disciple; Fish spawning On treetops; A cat carrying away A dog; A gunny-sack Driving a bullock-cart; A buffalo going out to graze, Sitting on a horse; A tree with its

Pad-s (New Delhi, 2000). The number following the abbreviation indicates the number of the poem in that edition. Songs of Kabir Upside-Down Poems Brother, I’ve seen some Astonishing sights: A lion keeping watch Over pasturing cows; A mother delivered After her son was; A guru prostrated Before his disciple; Fish spawning On treetops; A cat carrying away A dog; A gunny-sack Driving a bullock-cart; A buffalo going out to graze, Sitting on a horse; A tree with its

branches in the earth, Its roots in the sky; A tree with flowering roots. This verse, says Kabir, Is your key to the universe. If you can figure it out. KG 116 This and the following three poems are from a group of enigmatic padas called ulatbamsi or “poems in upside-down language.” In them, instead of performing a communicative role, language disrupts communication, forcing us to think in new ways. Reading one of these padas is like receiving a well-directed blow to the head. Using

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