Red Star: The First Bolshevik Utopia (Soviet History, Politics, Society, and Thought)

Red Star: The First Bolshevik Utopia (Soviet History, Politics, Society, and Thought)

Language: English

Pages: 272

ISBN: 0253203171

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


"[A] surprisingly moving story." ―The New Yorker

"Bogdanov's novels reveal a great deal about their fascinating author, about his time and, ironically, ours, and about the genre of utopia as well as his contribution to it." ―Slavic Review

"Bogdanov's imaginative predictions for his utopia are both technological and social... Even more farsighted are [his] anxious forebodings about the limits and costs of the utopian future." ―Science Fiction Studies

"The contemporary reader will marvel at [Bogdanov's] foresight: nuclear fusion and propulsion, atomic weaponry and fallout, computers, blood transfusions, and (almost) unisexuality." ―Choice

A communist society on Mars, the Russian revolution, and class struggle on two planets is the subject of this arresting science fiction novel by Alexander Bogdanov (1873–1928), one of the early organizers and prophets of the Russian Bolshevik party. The red star is Mars, but it is also the dream set to paper of the society that could emerge on earth after the dual victory of the socialist and scientific-technical revolutions. While portraying a harmonious and rational socialist society, Bogdanov sketches out the problems that will face industrialized nations, whether socialist or capitalist.

Justine, Philosophy in the Bedroom, and Other Writings

Occasion for Loving

Tigers in Red Weather

Vigil in the Night

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

with various organic combinations in nature and with the means by which nature creates her stable and developing systems, he was once again struck by a number of similarities and coincidences. Finally he arrived at the following conclusion: no matter how different the various elements of the Universe—electrons, atoms, things, people, ideas, planets, stars—and regardless of the considerable differences in their combinations, it is possible to establish a small number of general methods by which

bewildered me. I learned them mechanically . . . [but] I did not really understand them. . . . I was like those mathematicians of the seventeenth century whose static thought was organically incapable of comprehending the living dynamism of infinitely small quantities.” When Leonid tried to work alongside Martians in a clothing factory he found that he lacked “the culture of concentration” and could not keep up with their work tempo. He was humiliated when they constantly had to help him, even

died—between that which is and that which is not? You need whole words and phrases to express this distinction. Is it not better to indicate it simply by adding a single letter to the same word?” At any rate, Netti was satisfied with my memory. His teaching methods were superb, and I made rapid progress. This helped me to make friends with the Martians, and I began traveling about the etheroneph with increased confidence, dropping in to the rooms and laboratories of my fellow passengers and

there up above. “You must return when you have accomplished your mission,” he said, and to me his words sounded like a gentle reminder to be brave. I lost track of time as we discussed the necessity of the assignment and its many difficulties. Netti looked at the chronometer. “We have arrived. Let’s rejoin the others!” he exclaimed. The etheroneph came to a stop, the wide metal plates opened, and fresh air rushed in. Above us was a clear blue green sky—around us, a throng of people. Menni and

include in your demands a stop to the thievery, the trial of the criminals, and the confiscation of everything they have stolen. At the same time that you issue your manifesto I will publish my book of disclosures, which will be buttressed by exact data and documents. On this point we can expect the support of broad segments of the bourgeoisie who have suffered at the hands of the syndicates and hate them and their billionaire swindlers. True, the struggle is going to be even more bitter than it

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