Rasputin: The Untold Story

Rasputin: The Untold Story

Joseph T. Fuhrmann

Language: English

Pages: 320

ISBN: 1118172760

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Based on new sources—the definitive biography of Rasputin, with revelations about his life, death, and involvement with the Romanovs

A century after his death, Grigory Rasputin remains fascinating: the Russian peasant with hypnotic eyes who befriended Tsar Nicholas II and helped destroy the Russian Empire, but the truth about his strange life has never fully been told. Written by the world's leading authority on Rasputin, this new biography draws on previously closed Soviet archives to offer new information on Rasputin's relationship with Empress Alexandra, sensational revelations about his sexual conquests, a re-examination of his murder, and more.

  • Based on long-closed Soviet archives and the author's decades of research, encompassing sources ranging from baptismal records and forgotten police reports to notes written by Rasputin and personal letters
  • Reveals new information on Rasputin's family history and strange early life, religious beliefs, and multitudinous sexual adventures as well as his relationship with Empress Alexandra, ability to heal the haemophiliac tsarevich, and more
  • Includes many previously unpublished photos, including contemporary studio photographs of Rasputin and samples of his handwriting
  • Written by historian Joesph T. Fuhrmann, a Rasputin expert whose 1990 biography Rasputin: A Life was widely praised as the best on the subject

Synthesizing archival sources with published documents, memoirs, and other studies of Rasputin into a single, comprehensive work, Rasputin: The Untold Story will correct a century's worth of misconception and error about the life and death of the famous Siberian mystic and healer and the decline and fall of Imperial Russia.

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5, 12–13. 54 ‘it represents the Khlyst heresy’ TFGATO, F. 156, op. 28, khr. 1962-II, l. 5, 12. 54 ‘entire family does the same’ TFGATO, F. 156, op. 28, khr. 1962-II, l. 11. 55 ‘love each other and do good’ TFGATO, F. 156, op. 28, khr. 1962-II, l. 11. See also Bokhanov, Rasputin, 44, 159, 301. 55 ‘missionary against the sectarians’ TFGATO, F. 156, op. 28, khr. 1962-II, l. 13. 55 ‘sacrifices to the parish church’ See Bokhanov, Rasputin, 44, or the issue of the Tobolsk Diocese News on file in

Alexandra and a member of Rasputin's circle Pierre Gilliard, the imperial children's French tutor and a friend of the family Charles Sydney Gibbes, the imperial children's English tutor RASPUTIN'S FRIENDS AND ASSOCIATES Brother Makary, a starets at the Saint Nicholas Monastery at Verkhoturye Sister Maria, a staritsa at the Abalak Monastery Ivan Dobrovolsky, corrupt ex-school inspector; Rasputin's first business manager Aaron Simanovich, jeweler, gambler, and loan shark; Rasputin's business

she accepted it. The 75,000 rubles Alexandra gave Rasputin from her own private chancery at the moment they parted had all the earmarks of a farewell gift—a goodwill offering that would end her family's relationship with the peasant on as pleasant a note as possible. But the empress would not give up in such instances—that was the second half of the story. In May 1914, Rasputin returned to the capital. It seems likely that Alexis suddenly needed Rasputin, although later events suggest that the

she accepted it. The 75,000 rubles Alexandra gave Rasputin from her own private chancery at the moment they parted had all the earmarks of a farewell gift—a goodwill offering that would end her family's relationship with the peasant on as pleasant a note as possible. But the empress would not give up in such instances—that was the second half of the story. In May 1914, Rasputin returned to the capital. It seems likely that Alexis suddenly needed Rasputin, although later events suggest that the

“Yids,” he befriended Jews, especially businessmen and prostitutes. Rasputin always sympathized with marginalized people—this might even have been a reason for his defense of Pitirim. At any rate, Nicholas pressured the Holy Synod to promote Pitirim to archbishop of Samara. The local postmaster was surprised to see that Pitirim came to the post office to send Rasputin a wire congratulating him on his Name Day in 1913. The postmaster shared the news with the local governor, and the word spread

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