Mayor 1%: Rahm Emanuel and the Rise of Chicago's 99%

Mayor 1%: Rahm Emanuel and the Rise of Chicago's 99%

Kari Lydersen

Language: English

Pages: 220

ISBN: 1608462226

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


How did a city long dominated by a notorious Democratic Machine become a national battleground in the right-wing war against the public sector? In Mayor 1%, veteran journalist Kari Lydersen takes a close look at Chicago mayor Rahm Emanuel and his true agenda.

With deep Wall Street ties from his investment banking years and a combative political style honed in Congress and the Clinton and Obama administrations, Emanuel is among a rising class of rock-star mayors promising to remake American cities.

But his private-sector approach has sidelined and alienated many who feel they are not part of Emanuel’s vision for a new Chicago—and it has inspired a powerful group of activists and community members to unite in defense of their beloved city.

Kari Lydersen is a Chicago-based journalist, author and journalism instructor who has written for the Washington Post, the New York Times, the Progressive, In These Times, and other publications. She is the author of four books, including The Revolt on Goose Island: The Chicago Factory Takeover and What it Says About the Economic Crisis. She specializes in coverage of labor, energy and the environment. She has taught at Columbia College Chicago and Northwestern University and also works with youth from low-income communities through the program We the People Media. karilydersen dot com.

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doesn’t jibe with the uncertainty of service quality,” noted Bloomberg Businessweek magazine. “Assets sold now could change hands many times over the next 50 years, with each new buyer feeling increasing pressure to make the deal work financially. It’s hardly a stretch to imagine service suffering in such a scenario; already, the record in the U.S. has been spotty.”59 Proponents stressed that the trust would not actually sell or lease public assets or services, like the Skyway or the parking

Artists: How Obama’s Team Fumbled the Recovery (New York: Simon & Schuster, 2011), 143. 40. Bill Summary and Status for HR 3355 (Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994), at http://thomas.loc.gov/cgi-bin/bdquery/z?d103:H.R.3355:. 41. “Too Little, Too Late: President Clinton’s Prison Legacy,” Justice Policy Institute, February 2001. 42. US Department of Justice, “Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994 Fact Sheet,” October 24, 1994, at

governmental service. Whether one liked Emanuel or not, it appeared he was qualified to run for mayor. But in Chicago candidates are famous for trying to kick each other off the ballot for any number of obscure and arcane reasons.22 The twenty people who turned in petitions seeking to run for mayor included Halpin himself. “As a lifelong Chicagoan, I considered a mayoral run because I am passionate about the city, its residents and its future,” he said.23 A homeless man with a criminal record

station.35 Despite the arrests, the occupation continued for weeks. People were still camping there (albeit without tents) on June 5, the day Helen Morley died. That afternoon Allen McNair got a call from a caseworker at Thresholds, a private mental health provider where Morley received medication. The caseworker told McNair that after Morley had missed several appointments, she was found dead in her apartment, from what turned out to be a heart attack. McNair was overcome with shock. He

said it would announce closures by December 1, 2012.138 Community groups had long been pushing for a moratorium on school closings, and in January 2012 state legislators introduced a bill that would have blocked school closings during the 2013–14 school year. But now parents and teachers in low-income African American and Latino neighborhoods on the South and West Sides feared that their local schools would be closed. Anticipating the move, in June 2012 KOCO joined groups in New York; Detroit;

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