Lippincott's Illustrated Q&A Review of Neuroscience

Lippincott's Illustrated Q&A Review of Neuroscience

Language: English

Pages: 224

ISBN: 1605478229

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Lippincott's Illustrated Q&A Review of Neuroscience offers up-to-date, clinically relevant board-style questions—perfect for course review and board prep! Approximately 500 multiple-choice questions with detailed answer explanations cover frequently tested topics in neuroscience. Readers will find questions related to clinical topics, USMLE-style clinical vignettes, and content review questions. The book is heavily illustrated with clinical photographs and images portraying signs and symptoms and radiological images, including ultrasounds, PET scans, MRIs, CT scans, and X-rays.

Online access to the questions and answers on a companion website provides flexible study options.

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How Puzzles Improve Your Brain: The Surprising Science of the Playful Brain

The Effects of Drug Abuse on the Human Nervous System

Methods in Mind

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

bilateral loss of all sensory modalities on the lower extremities. The man notes that these “funny sensory feelings” have progressed from nonexistent to severe over time, but he is not sure how long. 26 MRI reveals a single lesion, elliptical in shape, about 2 × 3 cm in size. This tumor is most likely which of the following? (A) Anaplastic astrocytoma (B) Glioblastoma multiforme (C) Oligodendroglioma (D) Meningioma (E) Schwannoma 27 Impingement on which of the following structures would most

110 m/s. Generally, this applies to lower motor neurons in the spinal cord as well as in the motor nuclei of cranial nerves. Visceromotor (autonomic) fibers have small diameters, are lightly myelinated, and have conduction velocities of less that 18 m/s (preganglionic) or less than 2 m/s (postganglionic). 7/27/2010 9:18:24 AM 164 Chapter 18 27 The answer is B (The approximate middle one-third of the precentral gryus). The somatomotor cortex (also commonly called the primary somatomotor

behavioral changes, coupled with distinct clear morphological changes in his MRI; collectively, these are characteristic of Huntington disease. The most obvious feature in this image is a loss of the head of the caudate nucleus, reduction in size of the putamen, and a hyperintense appearance of both of these structures. These signify a significant loss of the medium spiny neurons and resultant gliosis. Also seen are hyperintense areas in the cingulate and insular cortices; degenerative changes

The Pons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Chapter 9 The Midbrain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 Chapter 10 An Overview of Cranial Nerves of the Brainstem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82

from cells in the trigeminal ganglion and are the first-order neurons in the pathway conveying pain and thermal sense, and discriminative touch, from the face and oral cavity. The primary sensory axons conveying pain and thermal information terminate in the spinal trigeminal nucleus pars caudalis. Those fibers concerned with discriminative touch terminate in the principal sensory nucleus. Both of these trigeminal nuclei contain cells that give rise to trigeminothalamic projections.

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