Liberty in the Age of Terror: A Defence of Civil Liberties and Enlightenment Values

Liberty in the Age of Terror: A Defence of Civil Liberties and Enlightenment Values

A. C. Grayling

Language: English

Pages: 304

ISBN: 1408803070

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


"The means of defence against foreign danger historically have become the instruments of tyranny at home." James Madison

Our societies, says Anthony Grayling, are under attack not only from the threat of terrorism, but also from our governments' attempts to fight that threat by reducing freedom in our own societies - think the 42-day detention controversy, CCTV surveillance, increasing invasion of privacy, ID Cards, not to mention Abu Ghraib, rendition, Guantanamo…

As Grayling says: 'There should be a special place for political irony in the catalogues of human folly. Starting a war 'to promote freedom and democracy' could in certain though rare circumstances be a justified act; but in the case of the Second Gulf War that began in 2003, which involved reacting to criminals hiding in one country (Al Qaeda in Afghanistan or Pakistan) by invading another country (Iraq), one of the main fronts has, dismayingly, been the home front, where the War on Terror takes the form of a War on Civil Liberties in the spurious name of security. To defend 'freedom and democracy', Western governments attack and diminish freedom and democracy in their own country. By this logic, someone will eventually have to invade the US and UK to restore freedom and democracy to them.'

In this lucid and timely book, Grayling sets out what's at risk, engages with the arguments for and against examining the cases made by Isaiah Berlin and Ronald Dworkin on the one hand, and Roger Scruton and John Gray on the other, and finally proposes a different way to respond that makes defending the civil liberties on which western society is founded the cornerstone for defeating terrorism.

Putting Our House in Order: A Guide to Social Security and Health Care Reform

America-Lite: How Imperial Academia Dismantled Our Culture (and Ushered In the Obamacrats)

Alex Salmond: My Part in His Downfall: The Cochrane Diaries

The Next 100 Years: A Forecast for the 21st Century

The Left Alternative

Empire's New Clothes: Reading Hardt and Negri

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

and groups, and whatever political structures are built must reflect this fact. The Federalists, by contrast, argued that there is such a thing as ‘the public good’, and that it is possible to identify ‘the real welfare of the great body of the people’ (as Madison put it). In the debate over the proposed Constitution, which lasted from the autumn of 1787 until it was at last ratified in 1789, three of those closely associated with drafting it – James Madison, Alexander Hamilton and John Jay –

be abrogated, a reason that will override those rights in the light of some more powerful consideration – such as, for example, their forfeiture by a sufficiently serious criminal act justifying deprivation of an individual’s liberty. The effect of the articles is to prise open a space, and then to protect it, in which individuals can exercise choices and capacities to make the best of their other circumstances – although here too the UDHR is ambitious and stipulative, claiming that education

Chapter 21. Roger Scruton and Sentimental Reaction Chapter 22. John Gray and the Pose of Pessimism Chapter 23. Slavoj Zizek and the Inversion of Values Chapter 24. John Ralston Saul and Voltaire’s Bastards Chapter 25. Tzvetan Todorov: Hope and the Good Chapter 26. History and Progress in the Twentieth Century Chapter 27. Justice at Last? Appendix 1: Laws and measures that have reduced civil liberties in the United Kingdom and the United States in recent years Appendix 2: (a) The Universal

Chapter 21. Roger Scruton and Sentimental Reaction Chapter 22. John Gray and the Pose of Pessimism Chapter 23. Slavoj Zizek and the Inversion of Values Chapter 24. John Ralston Saul and Voltaire’s Bastards Chapter 25. Tzvetan Todorov: Hope and the Good Chapter 26. History and Progress in the Twentieth Century Chapter 27. Justice at Last? Appendix 1: Laws and measures that have reduced civil liberties in the United Kingdom and the United States in recent years Appendix 2: (a) The Universal

heavier­than-air flight, was only just beginning to understand the internal structure of the atom, was still virtually powerless against microbes, and mostly believed that knowledge was in essentials complete. Less than half a century later the first atomic weapons exploded over Hiroshima and Nagasaki, dropped by long-range bombers, and some of the survivors were treated with penicillin. Anyone who had lived through the mighty changes thus expressed would have been even more amazed by the

Download sample

Download