Learning English as a Foreign Language For Dummies

Learning English as a Foreign Language For Dummies

Gavin Dudeney, Nicky Hockly

Language: English

Pages: 368

ISBN: 0470747471

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Do you know a bit of English, and want to improve without a teacher? Whether you're a student, a traveller, or you just want to learn basic English, this plain-speaking guide will help you pick up the essentials so you'll be understanding and speaking English in no time. Improve your grammar, speech, vocabulary and pronunciation at your own pace, and prepare yourself to get around in any English-speaking country comfortably - and without embarrassment!

Learning English as a Foreign Language For Dummies includes:

Part I: Getting Started
Chapter 1: You Already Know a Little English
Chapter 2: Basic English Grammar
Chapter 3: Greetings and Introductions  

Part II: English in Action
Chapter 4: Shopping and Numbers
Chapter 5: Eating Out
Chapter 6: Out on the Town
Chapter 7: Hobbies and Free Time
Chapter 8: Talking on the Phone
Chapter 9: At the Office and Around the House
Chapter 10: Written English - Newspapers and Signs

Part III: English on the Go
Chapter 11: Money
Chapter 12: Checking into a Hotel
Chapter 13: Asking Directions and Getting Around
Chapter 14: Handling Emergencies   

Part IV: The Part of Tens
Chapter 15: Ten Ways to Speak English Quickly
Chapter 16: Ten Favourite English Expressions
Chapter 17: Ten Holidays to Remember
Chapter 18: Ten Phrases That Make You Sound Fluent in English

Part V: Appendices 
Appendix A: Phrasal verbs explained
Appendix B: Common Verbs  [Agree, Can / be able, Come, Do, Go, Have, Make , Need, Put, Think] English Irregular Verbs
Appendix C: On the CD

Note: CD-ROM/DVD and other supplementary materials are not included as part of eBook file.

English Skills with Readings

Research Papers For Dummies

The Cambridge History of the English Language, Volume 1: The Beginning to 1066

Collins Introducing English to Young Children: Spoken Language

Success With Foreign Languages: Seven Who Achieved It and What Worked for Them

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

o’clock?’. ✓ Affirmative: • I’ll ring you tomorrow. • Jane will get back to you as soon as she can. 35 36 Part I: Getting Started ✓ Negative: • I won’t ring you tomorrow. • Jane won’t be back in the office until late. ✓ Question: • Will you give me a hand with the shopping? • What will you wear to the party? Going to You use ‘[form of ‘to be’] + going to’ + base form of the verb to talk about future plans; for example ‘We’re going to drive around Scotland

o’clock?’. ✓ Affirmative: • I’ll ring you tomorrow. • Jane will get back to you as soon as she can. 35 36 Part I: Getting Started ✓ Negative: • I won’t ring you tomorrow. • Jane won’t be back in the office until late. ✓ Question: • Will you give me a hand with the shopping? • What will you wear to the party? Going to You use ‘[form of ‘to be’] + going to’ + base form of the verb to talk about future plans; for example ‘We’re going to drive around Scotland

don’t need to go to an expensive restaurant to eat well in the UK. People often prefer to eat in (at home). If you don’t want to cook yourself, you can always order takeaway food, which can be inexpensive and very tasty! Ordering takeaway food Apart from international hamburger takeaway places, which are almost the same all over the world, you have other options for cheap and fast takeaway food in Britain. The UK’s large Middle Eastern population means that lamb kebabs (meat on a stick) are easy

tomorrow. Joining a gym or health club If you want to do regular exercise then you might think about joining a gym or a health club. Some of these can be very expensive and you have to pay a lot of money every month to be a member. Other clubs are cheaper and you can often pay a small amount of money each month and then pay an additional amount for what you use. Chapter 7: Hobbies and Free Time You can take part in plenty of activities at gyms and health clubs, such as those in the following

person listening time to write it down. So 257839088 is ‘two-fiveseven [pause] eight-three-nine [pause] oh-double-eight’. If there is an area or country code before the number, we say these numbers all together. For example the code for Brighton in the UK is 01273, so we say the Brighton phone number 01273 784 933 like this: ‘oh-one-two-seven-three [pause] seven-eight-four [pause] nine-double three’. With international country codes, you often say ‘plus’ before, because this is how you write,

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