I Found it at the Movies: Reflections of a Cinephile

I Found it at the Movies: Reflections of a Cinephile

Philip French

Language: English

Pages: 304

ISBN: B007BTHDOE

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


For nearly half a century Philip French's writing on cinema has been essential reading for filmgoers, cinephiles and anyone who enjoys witty, intelligent engagement with the big screen. His vast knowledge of the medium is matched by his love for it. I Found It at the Movies collects some of the best of Philip French's film writing from 1964 to 2009. Its subjects are as various, entertaining and challenging as cinema itself: Kurosawa and the Addams family; Satyajit Ray and Doris Day; from Hollywood and the Holocaust to British cinema and postage stamps. I Found It at the Movies is an illuminating companion to the world of the cinema. I Found It at the Movies is the first of three collections of Philip French's writings on film and culture

Bambi vs. Godzilla: On the Nature, Purpose, and Practice of the Movie Business

Napoleon: A Screenplay

The Philosopher At the End of the Universe: Philosophy Explained Through Science Fiction Films

The American Counterculture

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

critical stances then, Darling, Alfie and Morgan have been reduced to the same final point – a celebration of the * Morgan’s car is actually got up to look like one of Peter Blake’s Pop doors. The film itself is being advertised with a Pop art poster by Barry Fantoni, host of the TV teen show A Whole Scene Going. Ironically enough, when the stage version of Saturday Night and Sunday Morning eventually arrived in London, the poster for it was designed by Derek Boshier in the style of Roy

particularly All the Better Books 63 concerned with here. Rather, my interest centres upon the use of identifiable works, where what is at stake is neither the nature of their creation nor the personality of their creators, but the use that directors make of them. The risks of misunderstanding, as I’ve already suggested, are immense. Let me give a couple of illustrations of what I mean. The first of these does not actually concern a work of art, though it brings up the same point. The critic

French and American cinema, he welcomed films from everywhere as well as anything to do with pictures. Along with the cans of films he accumulated (which were initially stored in an old folks’ home, the indigent pioneer moviemaker George Méliès entrusted with the key), Langlois amassed the astonishing collection of movie memorabilia, ranging from the original Expressionist set for Dr Caligari to Vivien Leigh’s dress in Gone With the Wind, that since 1972 has been on display in the Musée du Cinéma

two sensitive, intelligent artists to British life and their sexuality during a period of rapid social change, and Lambert brings to it the skills he has honed as screenwriter and novelist. Both Lambert and Anderson hated the snobbish, blinkered, unimaginative Britain into which they were born. But Lambert turned his back on it in 1956, resigning from the editorship of Sight & Sound to settle in America, embark on a successful career as a writer and become a confident cosmopolitan. Anderson

two sensitive, intelligent artists to British life and their sexuality during a period of rapid social change, and Lambert brings to it the skills he has honed as screenwriter and novelist. Both Lambert and Anderson hated the snobbish, blinkered, unimaginative Britain into which they were born. But Lambert turned his back on it in 1956, resigning from the editorship of Sight & Sound to settle in America, embark on a successful career as a writer and become a confident cosmopolitan. Anderson

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