Hearing the Gaze, Feeling the Sound: Directed Listening in Audio Remix Culture

Hearing the Gaze, Feeling the Sound: Directed Listening in Audio Remix Culture

John Cain Harrison

Language: English

Pages: 104

ISBN: 2:00145596

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


This thesis examines the cultural and textual forms that direct our experience of listening.
It addresses this consumption from both the bodily frameworks of intersectional subjectivity as well as affective assemblage. The concept of the assemblage allows for tracking mobile auditory flows of sensation, while intersectionality best models the position of minority bodies, minority politics, and minority listening in contemporary culture. In moving between these, I argue for the enduring, mutually-reinforcing necessity of using both. Finally, the remix provides both a methodological lens for revealing directive audio forms as well as marking a particular historic shift in listening.
In chapter one, I examine Spork! An Erotic Love Story(2009) by cirrocumulus and
jiaren_shadow. This piece is a reworking of the audiobook adaptation of the novelization of the eleventh Star Trek (2009) feature film. The woman-authored remix creates a male-male erotic story based on diegetically heterosexual protagonists. In doing so, it reveals the way listening is being directed in the original both in terms of intersectionality and sensation. The intersectional analysis focuses on gender, using the remix to bring out how listening is mediated through a male voice and the correspondence between this mediation and the erasure of women in the narrative. In terms of sensation, this comparison highlights the shift in encouraged manifestations of arousal from feelings rooted in action and adventure to that of sexual stimulation. I also explore the text‘s relationship to the Star Trekfranchise and its position as sound, as a remix, and as pornography. The chapter builds to an argument that remix culture facilitates an explosion of mediated bodies that represent a more flexible sense of the auditory for the contemporary moment.
Chapter two listens to the audio of a parodic remix of Lady Gaga‘s ―Alejandro‖ (2010)
by Latina comedienne, La Coacha (2010). The analysis locates the tensions between remix and source text at the intersection of race, sexuality, and gender, in its examination of the way Gaga‘s voice directs listeners in regards to Latin American male sexuality. Affectively, this chapter addresses humor and sensations of amusement. I conclude with a more thorough discussion of the union between affective and intersectional analytics and their mutual dependence as made clear in La Coacha‘s work.
Having paired grassroots remixes with commercial audio production in both chapters, the
conclusion uncouples them, returning to this introduction‘s examinations of Lady Gaga and DJ Earworm on their own. This section unpacks the question of who Lady Gaga and Earworm are. I sketch the relationship between the explosion of Gaga‘s body by commercial representation with the subsequent assembling of Earworm‘s out of these exploded pieces and those of other stars. This is followed by a discussion of the greater implications of the thesis for remix culture and for scholarship on listening.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

visual. Williams defines her field in terms of filmic hardcore with the title of the book even including the phrase, ―The frenzy of the visible.‖ Of course, it is hardly her fault as the pre-existing non-academic discourse on pornography operates under similar conditions. Supreme court Justice Potter‘s abovementioned statements on pornography included the proscription, ―I know it when I see it,‖ implying that he would not engage with it auditorily. Even the word, pornography contains the visual,

described the video as an exploration of her position as a gay male pop icon. Notably, despite her use of the Latino/Latin American names, Roberto, Fernando, and Alejandro in the lyrics, none of the video‘s male bodies are presented as other than white. “’ALEJANDRO’” AS REMIX Lady Gaga‘s ―Alejandro‖ music video was released on April 30, 2010. However, four days prior, La Coacha released what she had envisioned in the form of her own ―Alejandro‖ remix. Unlike Spork, in which a single text was cut

eliminating the possibilities of geographic, national, linguistic, colonial, phenotypic and historical definitions (10-16). This is to say, for example, that one cannot assign the label, ―Latino/a,‖ to all those whose heritage links them to territory colonized by the Spanish because this would include the Phillippines, nor can one point to the Spanish language because of the multiple indigenous languages that also hold meaningful positions for Latino/a Americans. This theme of non-coherence

the original refers to a situation being alright, enduring public intoxication contrasts dramatically with persistence through difficult financial circumstances. The new context directs our listening to an adjusted meaning of ―okay.‖ Cutting up and recombining song lyrics is not the only move DJ Earworm makes in assembling his remix. Gaga‘s ―Gonna be okay‖ along with the lines from Hilson and Jay Sean are also abstracted from their original music. The majority of the underscoring for ―Blame it on

the original refers to a situation being alright, enduring public intoxication contrasts dramatically with persistence through difficult financial circumstances. The new context directs our listening to an adjusted meaning of ―okay.‖ Cutting up and recombining song lyrics is not the only move DJ Earworm makes in assembling his remix. Gaga‘s ―Gonna be okay‖ along with the lines from Hilson and Jay Sean are also abstracted from their original music. The majority of the underscoring for ―Blame it on

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