Father Brown Stories (Penguin Popular Classics)

Father Brown Stories (Penguin Popular Classics)

G. K. Chesterton

Language: English

Pages: 127

ISBN: 2:00050280

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Immortalized in these famous stories, G. K. Chesterton's endearing amateur sleuth has entertained countless generations of readers. For, as his admirers know, Father Brown's cherubic face and unworldly simplicity, his glasses and his huge umbrella, disguise a quite uncanny understanding of the criminal mind at work. This edition includes eleven tales from G. K. Chesterton's The Innocence of Father Brown and The Wisdom of Father Brown.

Against The Spread (Anna Dawson's Vegas, Book 2)

Biting the Moon (Andi Oliver, Book 1)

Beneath the Bleak New Moon (Casey Holland Mystery, Book 3)

Rat Poison (Ingrid Langley and Patrick Gillard, Book 15)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

O’Brien, whose thoughts were on pleasanter things. ‘I can’t say it interests me much,’ said the Irishman frankly, ‘especially as it seems pretty plain now. Apparently Brayne hated this stranger for some reason; lured him into the garden, and killed him with my sword. Then he fled to the city, tossing the sword away as he went. By the way, Ivan tells me the dead man had a Yankee dollar in his pocket. So he was a countryman of Brayne’s, and that seems to clinch it. I don’t see any difficulties

doubtful about it himself. He put his spade in methodically in every place but just this. There must be a mighty fine potato just there.’ Flambeau pulled up the spade and impetuously drove it into the place. He turned up, under a load of soil, something that did not look like a potato, but rather like a monstrous, over-domed mushroom. But it struck the spade with a cold click; it rolled over like a ball, and grinned up at them. ‘The Earl of Glengyle,’ said Brown sadly, and looked down heavily

quite in your own province. It is a matter of physical science. The blacksmith is mistaken, not perhaps in saying that the blow was divine, but certainly in saying that it came by a miracle. It was no miracle, doctor, except in so far as man is himself a miracle, with his strange and wicked and yet half-heroic heart. The force that smashed that skull was a force well known to scientists—one of the most frequently debated of the laws of nature.’ The doctor, who was looking at him with frowning

with tar. These black beams were set crooked or criss-cross at all kinds of angles, giving the whole a most patchy and puzzling appearance. There were one or two windows, which appeared to be coloured and leaded in an old-fashioned but more elaborate style. The travellers looked at it with that paradoxical feeling we have when something reminds us of something, and yet we are certain it is something very different. Father Brown, even when he was mystified, was clever in analysing his own

out brief directions. When the priest heard the voice, a terrible change came over his countenance. But he remained composed; and never took his eye off the patch of flame which had begun by spreading, but now seemed to shrink a little as it hissed under the torch of the long silver spear of water. He kept his finger along the nozzle of the pipe to ensure the aim, and attended to no other business, knowing only by the noise and that semi-conscious corner of the eye, the exciting incidents that

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