A Companion to Cultural Geography

A Companion to Cultural Geography

Language: English

Pages: 544

ISBN: 1405175656

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


A Companion to Cultural Geography brings together original contributions from 35 distinguished international scholars to provide a critical overview of this dynamic and influential field of study.

  • Provides accessible overviews of key themes, debates and controversies from a variety of historical and theoretical vantage points
  • Charts significant changes in cultural geography in the twentieth century as well as the principal approaches that currently animate work in the field
  • A valuable resource not just for geographers but also those working in allied fields who wish to get a clear understanding of the contribution geography is making to cross-disciplinary debates

Voyages and Discoveries: The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques & Discoveries of the English Nation

Landscape Evolution in the United States: An Introduction to the Geography, Geology, and Natural History

The Journey of Imam Husain

Jeju Island Geopark - A Volcanic Wonder of Korea (Geoheritage, Geoparks and Geotourism)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

has been to define the cultural variables and the other ones as belonging to separate systems and then to ask about the influence of the systems upon one another. (1967: xii–xiii) Taking an ‘ecological’ approach, Geertz explained, would not separate the works of man from the processes of nature, but instead understand them as an integrated whole, since “material interdependencies” would “form a [single] community.” I will revisit these claims later. For my present purposes, what is of interest

Symbolic Landscape (1984) represents geography’s first sustained engagement with Marxism (see Mitchell this volume), while Duncan’s doctoral dissertation from which the ‘Superorganic’ essay (1980) was drawn was a critique born of humanistic geography. It can be argued that this marks a turning-point in cultural geography’s explicit (re)engagement with the discipline of Geography (Sauer himself generally withdrew from disciplinary engagement as Geography in the US, at least, underwent its

history during this period emphasized the interdisciplinary nature of cultural geography, a trend that continues today. The importation into geography of positivist theory, behavioral psychology and highly abstract quantitative methods in the 1960s provoked cultural geographers to challenge the prevailing emphasis on spatial model building. Cultural geographers’ emphasis on the symbolic dimension of human activities, the relevance of historical understanding of societal processes, and a

P. Patton and P. Foss. Sydney: Power Institute. Baudrillard, J. 1986: America, tr. C. Turner. New York: Routledge. Baudrillard, J. 1990: The Transparence of Evil: Essays on Extreme Phenomena, tr. J. J. St. John. London: Routledge. Benko, G. 1997: Introduction: modernity, postmodernity and the social sciences. In G. Benko and U. Strohmayer, eds., Space and Social Theory: Interpreting Modernity and Postmodernity. Oxford: Blackwell, 1–44. Berry, B. and Marble, D. F., eds. 1968: Spatial Analysis: A

Interpretations of Postmodernity. Oxford: Blackwell, 141–61. Olsson, G. 1992. Lines of Power: Limits of Language. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press. Ó Tuathail, G. 1996: Critical Geopolitics: The Politics of Writing Global Space. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press. Peet, R. 1977: The development of radical geography in the United States. In R. Peet, ed., Radical Geography. Chicago: Maaroufa, 6–30. Peet, R. 1998: Modern Geographic Thought. Oxford: Blackwell. Philo, C. 1991: The

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